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Site Geographies

County – Suffolk

In 1974 a two-tier administrative structure of (shire) counties and non-metropolitan districts was set up across the whole of England and Wales, except for the Isles of Scilly, Greater London and the six metropolitan counties.

Council functions were divided according to the level at which they could be practised most efficiently.

In consequence, counties took on functions including education, transport, strategic planning, fire services, consumer protection, refuse disposal, smallholdings, social services and libraries, whereas the local authority districts (LADs) had responsibility for local planning, housing, local highways, building, environmental health, refuse collection and cemeteries.  Responsibility for recreation and cultural matters was divided between the two tiers.

 

Districts

Suffolk is divided into 7 districts (Babergh, Forest Heath, Ipswich, Mid Suffolk, St Edmunds Bury, Suffolk Coastal, Waveney) each administered by a district councils.  http://www.suffolk.gov.uk/your-council/borough-and-district-councils-in-suffolk/ 

 

Electoral division – County electoral divisions

There are 63 Electoral divisions in the county of Suffolk.  Electoral divisions are the spatial units used to elect County Councillors and as such, all Electoral divisions nestle within the county exactly. Electoral divisions are the key building block of UK administrative geography, being the spatial units used to elect local government councillors in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan districts, unitary authorities and the London boroughs in England; unitary authorities in Wales; council areas in Scotland; and district council areas in Northern Ireland. 

 

Ward – District and borough wards. 

There are 167 Wards in the county of Suffolk.  Wards are the spatial units used to elect District Councillors and as such, all wards nestle within a District exactly. Electoral wards/divisions are the key building block of UK administrative geography, being the spatial units used to elect local government councillors in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan districts, unitary authorities and the London boroughs in England; unitary authorities in Wales; council areas in Scotland; and district council areas in Northern Ireland. 

 

Parish – (villages and towns)

English Parishes are a very old form of spatial unit which originally represented areas of both civil and ecclesiastical administration. They used to be significant local government areas but now have very limited functions. Some areas of the country have parishes and others do not, making them an unsatisfactory unit for national statistical production. As such, ONS release very little data as parish level.  More information about parishes and communities is available on the ONS website at

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/geography/beginner-sguide/administrative/england/parishes-and-communities/index.html

 

Lower layer super output area

Commonly known as LSOAs, lower layer super output areas had a minimum of 1,000 persons with an average of 1,500 persons when they were created from 2001 Census data. LSOA areas were redefined for the 2011 census and are in general the smallest geography used on the Observatory. 

As many data sets are available at LSOA it is convenient to produce aggregated values for larger geographies from the LSOA data.   In many cases these aggregated values will be exact as the larger geographies are often made up of made up of exact numbers of LSOA.  The main exceptions are the 2015 ward boundaries for Suffolk Coastal, and Lakenheath and Eriswell and the Rows in Forest Heath as these areas are not based upon LSOA but Output Areas.  As a consequence any aggregated data for these geographies will be estimated rather than exact. 

 

Output areas (not used)

Output areas are not used on the Suffolk Observatory as very little data is actually available at this geography.  Output areas were created for England and Wales from the 2001 Census data, by grouping a number of households and populations together so that each output area's population is roughly the same. 175,434 output areas were created from the 2001 Census data, each containing a minimum of 100 persons with an average of 300 persons. By using these output areas as containers for statistics, they are comparable in terms of population size. Output areas have a minimum number of persons (100) and households (40) to ensure that confidentiality of the individual or of a household is protected.

 

Other Area

To aid particular user groups a number of additional geographies have been set up.  The data associated with these geographies have been derived by aggregation from LSOA.  As the boundaries of the LSOA nest within the associated areas the aggregation process should be exact.   These other areas include:

 

Westminster Constituency

Children and Young people – Areas

Children and Young people – Localities

Children and Young people – Clusters

Children and Young people – Children Centre Reach Areas

Adult Community Services – Areas

Adult Community Services – Clusters

Clinical Commissioning Groups

Safer Neighbourhood teams